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Grilled Paleo Pizza Recipe

Grilled Paleo Pizza Recipe

Posted by on Jun 14, 2016 in Eat | 3 comments

My boyfriend Zayne and I have been paleo for one month. Ask us both what we miss the most and we’ll tell you, “pizza!” We live in New York City where pizza is available around every street corner and those $1 slices are just so easy to grab for a quick meal. Let’s just say, it’s been quite tempting. Last night, I decided to rid these pizza cravings once and for all. Thanks to the fine folks over at Wicked Spatula, I was able to create the most delicious grilled paleo pizza. You may be wondering why pizza is off limits to those practicing paleo. Well, dairy, flour and oil are off limits. Luckily, eggs, seeds and nuts are a paleo person’s best group of friends. As an alternative to your traditional pizza crust made with flour, this recipe calls for coconut and tapioca flour. Don’t worry, I had never used either of these flours before either. I wasn’t really sure what I was getting myself into but I gave it a shot and it turned out awesome! Paleo Pizza Crust Ingredients 1 cup tapioca starch 1/4 cup coconut flour 2 eggs 1 cup water Pinch of salt Toppings Your favorite pizza sauce (make sure it’s all natural and no sugar added!) Prosciutto (it’s just pork and salt – two essentials to life) Heirloom tomatoes Spinach Onion Green bell pepper Fresh Basil Instructions Preheat your grill to high before you begin making the pizza crust. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the ingredients together for the crust until smooth (hint: the coconut flour likes to clump, make sure it’s completely smooth for best results!) Heat a large cast iron skillet over high heat on your stove top (make sure it’s VERY hot!). Pour in just a tiny bit (seriously though, a TINY bit) of olive oil to grease the skillet. Pour in half the crust mixture and allow to cook until the top begins to set and bubble (this was the coolest part – the flours take no time at all to cook). Flip and allow to cook until the crust begins to crisp up. It should be golden brown and crisp on the outside....

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Kaldi: A Taste of Craft Beer in Iceland

Kaldi: A Taste of Craft Beer in Iceland

Posted by on Apr 19, 2016 in Drink, Travel | 0 comments

If you ever get the chance to visit the magical country of Iceland in winter, do it. Frozen waterfalls, mountains covered in snow and the Northern Lights; does it get much better? Well, add a little craft beer into the mix and you’ve got yourself an excellent vacation. Many tourists often drive the “Ring Road” in Iceland, which is a highway that forms a rough circle around the country. Although my boyfriend and I only had a Ford Fiesta with studded tires, we somehow made it through wintry weather without getting stuck. The microbrewery Bruggsmiðjan is located in the small town of Árskógssandur, which is just off the Ring Road. The brewery offers guided tours and a chance to sample Kaldi, the craft beer that is brewed here. We turned off the Ring Road and down a small road surrounded by towering mountains. Bruggsmiðjan wasn’t too hard to find since the brewery is clearly labeled with Kaldi bottles. We didn’t have a reservation, so on a whim we parked the car and knocked on the door. We were greeted by Agnes Anna, one of the brewery owners who invited us inside the facility. Bruggsmiðjan was established in December 2005, and the idea for starting a craft brewery came from two people in Árskogssandur, the couple Agnes Anna and Olafur Trostur. Agnes saw a small news report on Icelandic television about the growing popularity of small breweries in Denmark, and a week later she convinced her husband to head to Denmark to pay a visit to these breweries. Early in 2006, the couple found investors and today there are 15 individuals who share 44% of the company, and Agnes and Olafur own 56%. Agnes and Olafur wanted to give Icelandic people a new brand of beer, something high quality and rich in taste. The couple chose to use traditional Czech brewing because beers from the Czech Republic are known for their good quality. They hired a brewmaster named David Masa from the Czech Republic, who has studied brewing for 9 years, to craft recipes for their new brewery. Agnes and Olafur’s son and head brewer Sigurdur Bragi (“Siggi” for short) took us around the brewery to explain...

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Top Four Must-Try Dishes in Hoi An, Vietnam

Top Four Must-Try Dishes in Hoi An, Vietnam

Posted by on Apr 10, 2016 in Eat, Travel | 0 comments

Hoi An is one of Vietnam’s most charming, historic towns. Small alleys filled with colorful lanterns and the aroma of flowers lead you to some of the best food stands in town. After spending a few days in Hoi An and tasting some of the town’s most iconic dishes, there were definitely four dishes that still leave me wanting just one more bite. Banh Bao Banh Vac Only one family in Hoi An possesses the recipe for banh bao banh vac or “white rose.” The family supplies all of Hoi An with these dainty dumplings. “White rose” is a type of shrimp dumpling made from translucent white dough bunched up to look like a rose. The dumplings are served topped with crunchy bits of toasted garlic and served with a sweet and spicy dipping sauce. The original location to visit for the “white rose” dish is located at 533 Hai Bà Trang, owner Tran Tuan Ngai is the third generation secret keeper of the traditional recipe. Hoành Thánh Chiên  Hoành Thánh Chiên is quite the local specialty. This fried Hoi An wonton originally comes from China and has been adapted by the Vietnamese to suit the local taste. This particular wonton is made with rice flour and filled with ingredients like shrimp, pork, egg and spices. The Hoi An fried wonton is covered in a topping that reminds me of salsa. The topping includes a mixture of vegetables, pineapple and sweet and sour shrimp. The crunch and tangy, sweet flavors keep you coming back for more. Cao Lau Cao Lau is a dish made with noodles, pork and local greens. It’s only found in Hoi An and its unique taste and texture is achieved by using water from an undisclosed ancient Cham well located outside the town. This dish is different than typical Vietnamese noodle dishes because it has no soup. The locals call Cao Lau a “mixing dish” because it includes vegetables, thinly sliced pork and sauce on top of the noodles. It’s quite fun mixing all of the ingredients together on your own and adding lime juice or chili paste to taste. Com Ga Located down a small alley in the...

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Pasteur Street Brewing Company Brings Craft Beer to Vietnam

Pasteur Street Brewing Company Brings Craft Beer to Vietnam

Posted by on Mar 30, 2016 in Drink, Travel | 0 comments

Located down a small alley, Pasteur Street Brewing Company in Ho Chi Minh City is bringing a taste of American craft beer to Vietnam. Send up a short prayer as you cross the bustling streets filled with motorbikes and then head upstairs to the second floor at 144 Pasteur Street in the heart of Saigon– District 1 to be exact. In December 2014, Alex Violette, former head brewer at Boulder, Colorado’s Upslope Brewing Company opened the taproom of Pasteur Street Brewing Company, the first American craft brewery in Vietnam. The brewery uses local ingredients in their brewing process to craft inventive brews ranging from their Passionfruit Wheat Ale to Saigon Saison. The hops and malt are imported from around the world but their use of local ingredients gives this brewery’s craft beer a Southeast Asian twist. If you find yourself in the Ho Chi Minh City, head to the tasting room at Pasteur Street Brewing Company for a flight and some bar snacks. The flight includes six beer tastings, which pair perfectly with bar food options like the Nashville hot chicken and black eyed pea hummus. The food at Pasteur Street Brewing Company is certainly keeping up with the trends back in the States, which gives expats living in Vietnam a taste of home and locals an opportunity to experience new foods. After working hours the tasting room becomes packed with locals who are craving a taste of craft beer. One of my favorite craft beers at Pasteur Street Brewing Company is the Saigon Saison, a Farmhouse Ale with a spicy aroma and herbal character from locally grown lemongrass. Another easy drinking beer is the Jasmine IPA, which uses a blend of American hops to create a fruity hop profile along with dried jasmine flower added for the nose. If you’re more of a darker beer fan, the Ca Phe Porter is a coffee porter brewed to be sweet and chewy. This beer is smooth drinking, and brewed with locally roasted coffee beans to create a flavor loaded with chocolate, caramel and toffee notes. Overall, the selection at Pasteur Street Brewing Company are representative of American craft beer and is perfect for the beer lover...

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London-Style Gastro-Pub Coming to Downtown Durham

Posted by on Feb 16, 2016 in Eat | 0 comments

The British are coming! And they’re bringing fine ales and authentic curries to downtown Durham. Six Pence Ventures is bringing a new addition to the Durham food scene: an English gastro-pub featuring British and South Asian cuisine. The owners of Five-Points favorite Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub, Rhys Botica and Malachy Noone, have teamed up with part owner of the Triangle’s Tandurm food truck, BJ Patel, to open an English-style pub at the current location of Beyu Caffe (335 West Main Street). Once Beyu moves to its larger building, old mates Botica, Noone and Patel will move into the space and begin work on the pub and restaurant. They expect the move in to take place in May, with an opening slated for ten weeks after. The London-style public house will offer a wide range of English, European and local craft beers, along with a fine selection of single-malt scotch. When it comes to the food, Patel will bring the South Asian flavors of his popular Indian endeavors, as well as an exploratory approach to British food culture. Expect to see dishes such as Curried Shepherd’s Pie with Patel’s British-Indian-Asian cuisine practically transporting patrons to the streets of London. Chicken Tikka Masala was invented in the U.K., after...

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